The Beck And Call is an abandoned hotel in Sunken Charleston. Originally constructed some time in the early nineteenth century, it operated a moderately popular hotel until financial problems and a string of disappearances forced its closure and subsequent abandonment in the late seventeenth century.


Architecture

The Beck and Call exhibits a number of unusual architectural features, although it is not know which of these were part of the original design and which appeared at a later date. The hotel contains far more doors than it does rooms, with the floorplans registered at the Sunken Charleston City Planning Office showing hallways that lead only to rows of doors that open into concrete walls or empty air, often multiple stories up. Aesthetically, the interior and exterior design of the hotel has changed many times over the years, even after its abandonment, although at no point has any refurbishing work been reported. Despite these apparent renovations, visitors have consistently reported that the hotel's aesthetic always appears roughly 50 years out of fashion and in a state of severe disrepair.

Transdimensional Phenomena

Since the hotel's opening, a number of Transdimensional Phenomena have been observed and independently verified. Many of the doors located in the Beck and Call lead discontinuously to distant locations in space and time, often differing substantially in historical fact and physical laws from the point of origin. Similarly, doors throughout the Charleston area and occasionally beyond have been reported spontaneously opening into a hallway of the Beck and Call, regardless of what room is present on the other side. Surviving visitors who encounter such entrances report an almost overwhelming compulsion to find the source of a sound of splashing water, referred to in interviews as "The Fountain", although no fountains or other water features are included in the floorplan of the hotel.

Known Points of Egress and Ingress

While thorough mapping of the Beck and Call has proved impossible, some doors appear to remain largely consistent across visits and can be used somewhat reliably for travel. These include:

  • A deli walk-in freezer in Halifax (closed for health code violations)
  • An arch-shaped trellis in the Boston Flowers Memorial Bat Garden
  • The third stall from the left in the northwest bathroom in Choux Stadium
  • A maintenance hatch in the Hotdogfingers Memorial Climate Pledge Garage And Parking Facility Center For The Performing Arts Performance Space in Seattle, accessible only during the quarterly performance art show SEAMONSTER
  • A disused locker in the Charleston Shoe Thieves clubhouse
  • An empty movie theater where the first three minutes of Holes plays on repeat, the only notable item in the room being a pair of red and white blaseball shoes
  • A hatch leading into a hollow space inside the belly of the Blue Mustang statue at the Denver Airport
  • A large Mouth
  • A stock room in an abandoned Toys "R" Us on US-1 in Miami
  • A cell door in a dimensionally isolated and temporally looped instance of Johnny Cash's concert at Folsom Prison, the sounds of which can be heard throughout the Beck and Call



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